A couple of months ago, residents experienced a “crack-down” on unlicensed dogs in Thousand Oaks. This search was prompted by the fear of safety within the community. Residents and Officials  were concerned that many unlicensed dogs were not current on their rabies shots, something licensing would reveal. According to the Thousand Oaks Acorn, “The Thousand Oaks Municipal Code requires that all dogs 4 months or older be up-to-date on rabies vaccinations and be licensed.”

unlicensed dogs in Thousand Oaks

The City of Thousand Oaks is unaware of the vaccination record of unlicensed dogs. These unlicensed dogs are vulnerable to rabies. Rabies is a deadly virus, which can affect humans. The rabies virus attacks the nervous system, causing brain inflammation. The virus is transmitted through physical contact. A high amount of the virus can be found in the foaming saliva of an infected animal, which can be transmitted when an infected animal bites an uninfected animal.

Symptoms of Rabies in Dogs includes:

  1. Foaming in Mouth
  2. Loss of Appetite
  3. Weakness
  4. Fear of Water
  5. Dilated Pupils
  6. Seizures
  7. Trembling
  8. Increased Sensitivity to Light, Touch, or Sound
  9. Hanging Jaw
  10. Heaving Breathing
  11. Chocking Sounds
  12. Paralysis
  13. Loss of Control of Throat

WATCH VIDEO OF INFECTED DOG

Owners can prevent the transmission of rabies to their pets by vaccinating, keeping dogs leashed outdoors, and avoiding contact with wild animals like bats and raccoons.

In an effort to prevent Thousand Oaks dogs from acquiring rabies, the City is requiring pet licensing. If your dogs’ license expires, the owners can be charged a $30 late fee, as well as the annual license cost. In addition, if animals have no existing licenses, the owner can be charged a $40 field enforcement fee, as well as the annual license cost. In the City of Thousand Oaks, the cost of a dog license is $60 for unaltered dogs, $20 for altered dogs, and $7 for altered dogs owned by a senior resident.

Dog licenses help pay for animal services in the City of Thousand Oaks.  Ventura County contracts with Los Angeles County Animal Control Services.   The City of Thousand Oaks pays Los Angeles County around $240,000 annually for their services. The Los Angeles County Animal Control Services is responsible for responding to the city’s off-leash canines and any animal-related problems. According to the Thousand Oaks Acorn, “in 2014-15, $119,000 of the $240,000 contract was paid for with licensing fees.”  Usually a licensing tag is on the dog’s collar, which helps identify lost pets.

unlicensed dogs in Thousand Oaks

If you have lost your pet:

  1. Search for animals near your local shelter, reach out to your local shelter. Your pet may not be there during your first attempt. Many people try to search for the owner prior to bringing them to a shelter.
  2. Let your neighbors know, place signs up in local stores, neighborhoods, and veterinary clinics. Going door to door talking to neighbors is also a great idea!
  3. Check the list for deceased animals, unfortunately, the Animal Control Services may have found your pet deceased on a roadway or in your neighborhood. Make sure to check the list.

If you have found a pet it is important that you bring the pet to an animal shelter or pet hospital for scanning. Many times a microchip cannot be seen or felt. If the pet has a current owner, the shelter cannot place the pet for adoption, unless the owner does not reclaim it. The shelter will hold the pet for the state-mandated time period. If you decide to keep the pet, you cannot legally place the pet in a rescue or another third party until a period of 30 days has passed, in which you were trying to locate the owner. Animal Services encourages pet founders to make an active effort to find the real owners, which includes placing ads in a newspaper and filling out a found report at an animal shelter.

unlicensed dogs in Thousand Oaks

Ultimately, it is important to license your pets in the City of Thousand Oaks. Having unlicensed dogs in Thousand Oaks is dangerous to our community. Licensing your pet can help you locate them when lost and avoid you fines by the city. It is vital that you vaccinate your pet for rabies and take necessary precaution to prevent your pet from obtaining this virus. If you encounter a found pet, take it to your local animal shelter or pet hospital for scanning! Pet licensing is very important to the safety of our community.  If you get bit by a dog, immediately seek medical treatment.

Have a serious injury and need legal advice? Contact Howard Blau.

[A]: http://www.toacorn.com/news/2016-03-10/Community/Animal_control_begins_search_for_unlicensed_dogs.html
[B] http://www.vcas.us/find-lost-and-or-adoptable-animals
[C]: http://www.vcas.us/info-resources/ordinances